Exchange 2007 high memory usage (Full Version)

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bhfoto -> Exchange 2007 high memory usage (8.May2007 2:13:59 PM)

Hello,

I have 4 Exchange servers installed, 2 CCR mailbox servers each with 12GB ram and 2 HT/CA servers each also with 12GB ram. I am having an issue on the active CCR node. I have approx 200 mailboxes so far and the memory usage seems to be excessive. It is currently running at 11GB memory usage. Initially I had 4GB ram on each server and i thought perhaps if i upgrade the memory, the utilization would not be so high. Any idea why this is so?

Thanks,

BHFOTO




Henrik Walther -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (8.May2007 2:21:07 PM)

The behavior you see on the active node in your CCR cluster is completely normal. This is in order to allocate as much data in memory address space as possible, so that each user experience great performance in their Outlook clients.

Why have 12GB of memory if it isn't used?

BTW if another process should need the more memory, the Exchange store.exe process will released it as required. This is by design.




bhfoto -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (8.May2007 2:33:57 PM)

So you're saying that if I was to bump it up to 16 or even 32GB RAM the utilization would still be 95%? So how can i tell exactly how much utilization is actually on the box? I will eventually have over 1800 users on these servers... My utilization on the HT/CA servers was also very high but now its much better. 




Henrik Walther -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (9.May2007 2:00:19 AM)

Yes that's what I'm saying although I haven't deployed any CCR cluster nodes with mode than 12GB yet.

At least the store.exe process will use any unallocated memory it deem necessary.





SKG -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (18.May2007 7:10:16 PM)

What processor / processors you are using?
What is the motherboard, and what hard disk structure do you have.

I might be able to make a few suggestions!

I am guessing that you probably need to re-address the balance of your system designs.
Often you can improve performance by changing other things. Adding RAM tends to be expensive - and Exchange servers gobble most of it up. Basically no matter what you put in, it will use, so don’t go nuts with the RAM.

Before I even know what processor you have, I can tell you that performance will probably improve by upgrading to a CPU with higher cache in particular, speed generally - and obviously if you can add a second CPU! Almost goes without saying, but sounds like you need to be reminded - before you break the bank on RAM. Bear in mind that CPU prices fall and RAM does too, so no need to buy just yet – especially more RAM for 120 users. Wait until that quadruples!

For desktops RAM tends to be more important as they don’t have much, but for servers, its the CPU, as they are designed to use more RAM for SERVING. After about 8GB quite often you need to really think where your putting your money.

You might also want to move your accounts to a really fast raid array, or perhaps add another system (for the same price or less than the cost of all that RAM)!

Network location of the servers is also important to get the most out of them. They need to be relatively well juxtaposed to the clients. Quite often you can simply add another network card, make sure the server is set up to use both, and that takes care of the bottle neck you would never have thought about. Also look at your switches! Make sure you don’t have not so fast, “fast Ethernet switches”. If you do, replace them with gigabit or better.

The actual network card(S) themselves are also important. One with plenty of ability, tends to reduce the stress on the CPU, the RAM, the hard drives and the network!
Just remember throwing money at a problem wont make it go away. Design a solution.
Good luck.




etolbert -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (24.Oct.2007 11:18:11 AM)

 I have the same High memory issue only it is shutting down my Transport services.  Any thoughts?




rishishah -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (20.Nov.2007 5:47:38 AM)

etolbert,

Its called Back Pressure that is shutting down your Transport Services... have a look at http://www.exchangeinbox.com/articles/052/backpressure.htm




BFrank -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (3.Aug.2009 12:13:55 PM)

I also have this issue. I have a CCR cluster both nodes have 64 GB RAM and as if right now 59011.52 MB or 91.48% of it us being used. Most of it is from the Store.exe.

I've been through my App and Sys logs and there is no mention of memory issues. I am assuming this is by design but man that is A LOT of RAM.




catzodellamarina -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (3.Aug.2009 3:47:35 PM)

By design, doesn't Exchange eat as much RAM as you feed it?  Like SQL does?  In SQL there's an area in the GUI to set the memory allocated.  In Exchange isn't there a reg setting to throttle this?  At least that's what I heard.




sbq -> RE: Exchange 2007 high memory usage (3.Aug.2009 6:51:51 PM)

As has been said in other replies, the store process will take as much RAM as it can on a mailbox role server, one of the reasons it does this is to offload disk I/O by caching the users mailbox data in RAM.  Microsoft recommends roughly 5MB of RAM per user on the mailbox role server, so if you know how many users you will put on the mailbox server you can calculate how much RAM you should have in it (don't forget to put in extra for the OS and other processes).

Microsoft has a storage calculator that you can use to figure out how much CPU, RAM, and disk I/O you'll need based on your users and what their usage profile is, but be aware that this calculator doesn't automatically take in to account things like Blackberry users and such, so if you have a lot of users who will be resource hogs, like Blackberry users are, you'll likely need to fiddle with the variables to account for that.

Here's the link to the Exchange Dev team blog post about the latest version of the storage calc:
http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2007/01/15/432207.aspx




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